2019 ANPI Projects

Cope With Me

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The East 38th Street Black History Mural

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The Ones We've Been Waiting For

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YO MAMA'S Water(ing) (W)hole

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Cope with Me

Bao Vue and Mai Lee Vang
With Kang Vang, Pang Yang and Kue Xiong

About the project: 

Hmong American Film Director Bao and her Assistant Director Mai Lee understand too well from personal experience that depression feels isolating, but it doesn’t have to feel hopeless. Part of the isolation feeling comes from the lack of stories that represent Asian communities, like their own, that the media shares about depression. Therefore, they want to use the power of video storytelling to create a short narrative film about how three members of the Asian community in the Northwest suburbs of Minneapolis experience depression and share the ways they’ve learned to cope with it. Exploring the stories of this population and location is important not only because it represents their lived experience, but also that research has shown that more Asian communities are moving into the suburbs which tend to have lesser community resources and support, and can ultimately impact mental health.
 
They hope that the stories shared will be empowering and equip their audience with resources to tackle their own depression. At the video showings, there will be a panel conversation with the directors, film subjects, and community partners about their experience filming on this topic. Also, from the interests of the community, there will also be a peacemaking circle as an ongoing support group to engage those who cannot share their stories through video but still want to share it with others in a safe space. The circle will begin sometime in April 2019.

Bao Vue and Mai Lee        

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The East 38th Street African American History Mural

Reggie LeFlore
With Bryant Neighborhood Organization

About the project:

The purpose of the project is to bring people together to tell a community narrative of the history of African Americans in and around E. 38th Street (An historic African American cultural corridor) through the creation of a community designed mural at a significant location along the E. 38th Street Corridor in South Minneapolis. The vision for this mural was born from these and other conversations BNO had with community members. The vision for this mural is both a reflection of the old community in which people are still mourning, and the new community in which they hope for. Ironically, the future of east 38th street looks very similar to its former self.

The Ancestor The Identity and The Seed image

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The Ones We've Been Waiting For

Aaron Johnson-Ortiz and members of the PoliGraphix artist collective
With Centro de Trabajadores Unidos en Lucha, East Side Freedom Library, UMN Labor Education Services, PoliGraphix, Inquilinxs Unidxs Por Justicia, New Brookwood Labor College

About the project:

In collaboration with community and labor organizations, I will paint a series of portraits of low‐wage worker leaders ‐‐ mostly people of color and immigrants ‐‐ with the aim of (1) encouraging workers to see themselves as leaders, individually and also in solidarity with each other, (2) bridging the “formal” and “informal” labor movements (unions vs. other working class organizing efforts), (3) expanding the base of these organizations as well as strengthening the commitment of current members, and (4) helping to envision, think through, and develop what “class struggle” can look like in the current historical moment. Supplementary projects ‐‐including a group art exhibit, a poster and/or animated storytelling series, and inter‐organizational discussions‐‐ will bring in other artists, inform the broader context of grassroots struggle today, and repurpose these portraits for direct action organizing needs.

Aaron Johnson Ortiz images

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YO MAMA's Water(ing) (W)hole. Get Served. Be Prepared.

Amoke Kubat and Ego Ahaiwe
With Water Bar & Public Studio and Brenda Brazil

About the project:

YO MAMA’S Water(ing) (W)hole WATER BARS hold spaces for serving water to inform Mothers about the connections between water, care, community, and wellness in Minnesota. Through the activities of Gyrating & Hydrating: dancing and making fruit and plant based waters and Resilience Preparedness Workshops, Black (and IPOC) Mothers, living in North Minneapolis, gain awareness that climate change, extreme weather conditions and manmade disasters have profound impact on their physical, mental and emotional health and wellbeing. We are learning that water is life.

Yo Mama images

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